Magnus the Red – Project Change XXI

A Thousand Sons has just been released by Black Library. So to celebrate I will focus on the Thousand Sons for a little. This is Daemon Primarch Magnus the Red, commanding his legion of Epic-scale Tzeentch minions.

Magnus the Red Daemon Primarch of Tzeentch

Magnus the Red was one of four Daemon Primarchs released by Games Workshop in 1992 in Epic scale. Each of the four major Gods got one – Khorne got Angron, Slaanesh Fulgrim and Nurgle Mortarion. Pertarbo and Lorgar are the only other two Traitor Primarchs surviving in the present game setting, and both have been elevated to Daemon Prince status too, though neither have seen models. (And while I’m on the subject of Primarch models, Leman Russ is the only Imperial Primarch to have had one. Oh, and Lion El’Jonson’s Lion Helm comes with the Azrael model. Oh, and one of Horus’ Lightning Claws now belongs to Abbadon. I digress.)

The classic ‘Eavy Metal Magnus the Red is of course blue. It was painted blue by Jay Tanner presumably because blue is Tzeentch’s singature colour, and Mr. Tanner decided that the Red meant that in fact he was a ginger. Cap’n Facebeard of Warseer beautifully points out the 1992 studio colours “made him look like a 90s cartoon villain. You were always waiting for the Ninja Turtles to foil him.” It is so bizarre that during Games Workshop’s Red Era they decided not to paint Magnus the Red actual red.

Magnus the Red, Daemon Primarch of the Thousand Sons of Mangus

With the Horus Heresy series of books it’s stated that Magnus the Red had red skin. And instead of being a goofy Harryhausen Cyclops he has a one normal eye and an eyeless sockect. I will explain away all these differences by saying Tzeentch changed Magnus’ appearence when he elevated him to daemonhood.

I decided to paint my Magnus with pinky red skin akin to some of my Pink Horrors, as I felt bright red skin would make him look Khornate. And I decided my Magnus would also be a redhead with matching orangey wings. I wanted to do his vambraces copper, but that was too many similar colours on one model.

And, to be honest, goofy as this model is it’s also sculpted in a cockingly awful fashion. See his right leg? It’s just a weird amorphous blob I despaired at painting. The back of the model looks like an afterthought. And what’s going on with his giant head, and gibbon arms? It’s either a Jes Goodwin or Colin Dixon sculpt, and I’m hoping it’s Colin Dixon as he’d just started out at the company. I fancy doing one in the blue scheme at some point.

Alternative Blood Bowl Chaos Dwarf Bull Centaur

One more of my Gaspez Arts Chaos Dwarf Blood Bowlers.

Blood Bowl Chaos Dwarf Bull Centaur

This guy’s had some minor conversion work to him. I didn’t attach the shoulder horns that came as seperate pieces, and filed down their mountings. I figured the model’ll be on its side so often that delicate pieces will quickly snap off. Similarily, I bent the tail around in a u shape and glued it to the side of the leg for added stability. It’s already chipped and come off after just three games. Pinning and epoxy repairs are in order, but it’s hidden in the photo.

Problem with this model is that you can only lie it down sideways. Makes it difficult to work out whether it’s knocked down or stunned in gaming terms. But there’s only one of them on the team at the moment so it’s not something you can forget too easily. I want a second since the team’s composed largely of cheap Hobgoblins. With their high movement, Sprint and Sure Feet these guys can pretty much power their way through the opposition and score if you’re lucky enough to have them get a hold of the ball. Which is difficult thanks to their low agility.

I’m going to treat myself to some support staff models after I’ve finished the team. Gaspez‘ve got a lovely Spaghetti Goblin, and a Pizza Goblin. Dammit, and they’ve ust released some little fantasy football lizards they’ve painted in beautiful bright colours.

Gaspez Arts Camaleonti

Micro Flamer of Tzeentch – Project Change XX

Yellow is an interesting colour. Doubly so when shaded with the gaudy Warlock Purple. Would you experiment with that combination? I have. Here’s a 1990 Epic Tzeentch Flamer adopting the guise of Maynard Flux‘s Daemonic Familiar.

Epic Flamer of Tzeentch

Interesting? Lurid? Psychedlic? Well, I’m a little glad I didn’t do it on a larger model. Maybe a more sophisticated approach is called for. And now I realise that going forward I should avoid painting any of Tzeentch’s bird minions in yellows to avoid comparisons with Sesame Street.

I noted with the Epic scale Pink Horror that this generation of Chaos models were laughably out of scale. Let me explain this a little more. Epic is nominally a 6mm wargame, meaning the average trooper measures in at about 6mm. Here’s the Epic Flamer next to an Epic Dark Angel Hunter.

Epic Flamer of Tzeentch and Dark Angel Hunter

Why this hideous scale fail?

Theory One – the Epic Chaos Daemons were done at a time when Games Workshop were simplifying the amount of detailing on their Epic-scale models for ease of mass production. This meant chunkier details, less details, and bigger models (all the better to put big chunky details on).

Theory Two – Epic is out of scale with itself. People complain about not being able to fit ten Marines inside a Rhino in 40K. Well, try putting thirty 6mm Marines inside a Thunderhawk only 10mm long. Epic models were more abstract counters representing the troop types present on the battlefield, rather than being scale models.

Theory Three – Chaos Daemons should be this big all the time, it’s the 28mm ones that are scaled wrong.

Well, anyway, Games Workshop corrected it in 1998 with the Epic 40K plastic Chaos sprues. Here’s a comparison shot.

Giant Epic Daemons

This is one of the few examples of Games Workshop’s models getting smaller over time.

Micro Flamer of Tzeentch – Project Change XX

Yellow is an interesting colour. Doubly so when shaded with the gaudy Warlock Purple. Would you experiment with that combination? I have. Here’s a 1990 Epic Tzeentch Flamer adopting the guise of Maynard Flux‘s Daemonic Familiar.

Epic Flamer of Tzeentch

Interesting? Lurid? Psychedlic? Well, I’m a little glad I didn’t do it on a larger model. Maybe a more sophisticated approach is called for. And now I realise that going forward I should avoid painting any of Tzeentch’s bird minions in yellows to avoid comparisons with Sesame Street.

I noted with the Epic scale Pink Horror that this generation of Chaos models were laughably out of scale. Let me explain this a little more. Epic is nominally a 6mm wargame, meaning the average trooper measures in at about 6mm. Here’s the Epic Flamer next to an Epic Dark Angel Hunter.

Epic Flamer of Tzeentch and Dark Angel Hunter

Why this hideous scale fail?

Theory One – the Epic Chaos Daemons were done at a time when Games Workshop were simplifying the amount of detailing on their Epic-scale models for ease of mass production. This meant chunkier details, less details, and bigger models (all the better to put big chunky details on).

Theory Two – Epic is out of scale with itself. People complain about not being able to fit ten Marines inside a Rhino in 40K. Well, try putting thirty 6mm Marines inside a Thunderhawk only 10mm long. Epic models were more abstract counters representing the troop types present on the battlefield, rather than being scale models.

Theory Three – Chaos Daemons should be this big all the time, it’s the 28mm ones that are scaled wrong.

Well, anyway, Games Workshop corrected it in 1998 with the Epic 40K plastic Chaos sprues. Here’s a comparison shot.

Giant Epic Daemons

This is one of the few examples of Games Workshop’s models getting smaller over time.

G2 Pink Horror of Tzeentch Champion – Project Change XIX

Trish Morrison’s Pink Horror Champion. His trademark grin was self-inflicted because he wanted to show his facially-scarred girlfriend he still found her attractive.

Pink Horror of Tzeentch Champion

I can’t put my finger on when Lesser Daemons first got their Champions, as I still need to find a copy of 4th edition Fantasy’s Warhammer Armies Chaos. But I know the first official Daemon command models came out in 1997. (Ahhh. 1997 – when Minotaurs had great models.)

The Pink Horror Champion had an extra WS, BS, S, I and A over the standard Pink Horror. This was back in 5th edition Warhammer Fantasy, when Champions could regularly take magic items of their own rather than just being the guy at the front with a different name and an additional attack. But Daemon Champions couldn’t take magic items (unless they were a Daemon Battle Standard Bearer) and didn’t get access to any Daemonic Rewards (the Daemons’ equivalent of Magic Items). And so, with the exception of the improved stats, I can’t work out why people took them.

In modern Fantasy the Pink Horror Champion has been renamed to Iridescent Horror, and can also be fielded in 40K. There is no model for Iridescent Horrors yet, or Heralds of Tzeentch, so the Pink Horror Champion tends to crop up in both these roles. (Though the cheaper and more common approach is just painting a Pink Horror a different shade of pink – tsk.)

I did originally feel a little guilty that so much of Project Change seems to be Daemons. So, I counted up all the models the project’s scope includes, and then counted how many of them are categorised as Daemon. It’s a whopping 83% at present (not including the Daemon Engines, dragons possessed by daemons, sorcerers riding bound daemons or those weird Man O’War things I really ought to research more). And, as with this model only 74% of Project Change is classified as Daemon, I’m okay.

And, I realised that two Horrors ago I collected enough to field a 7th edition Fantasy regiment. Here they all are on a movement tray celebrating their new-found gamable status.

Weathered Rogue Trader Space Marines

This is one of my Warhammer turn-offs. You spend an age painting your army, only those not in the front rank to be hidden away where the painting goes unnoticed.