Spiral Eye, Pink Horror of Tzeentch Project Change XXVII

Another of Trish Morrison’s lovely G2 Pink Horror in a rich deep pink (achieved with Warlock Purple). Makes a nice change from the pale schemes I’ve seemed to favour with the majority of the Pink Horrors so far.

G2 Pink Horror of Tzeentch

The huge hands just remind me of the video to Everlong by the Foo Fighters, where Dave Grohl grows big hands to protect his lady.

Dave Grohl Tzeentching out on us

How many models are there for Project Change? Well, it’s difficult to count, I’ve broken down the models into the following categories:

  • G1 Daemons
  • G2 Daemons
  • G3 Daemons
  • G4 Daemons
  • Rogue Trader Renegades
  • Thousand Sons
  • Fantasy Champions
  • Beastmen
  • Dragons
  • Non-28mm (Epic, Warmaster, Man O’ War)
  • Collectibles (e.g. Black Library diorama with Madox)

The forces of Goof

So, just focussing on the G2 Daemons there are 88 possible models you can make:

1 G2 Lord of Change

13 G2 Pink Horrors
Pink Horror Champion, Pink Horror Standard, Pink Horror Musician, 2 one-piece Pink Horrors, 2 Pink Horrors with 4 tail options

10 G2 Blue Horrors

2 one-piece Blue Horrors, 2 Blue Horrors with 4 tail options

64 G2 Flamers
4 bodies with 4 right arm options and 4 left arm options

Which is a lot of figures.  The Flamers really break it as there are 64 ways of assembling the 12 components.  I think I’ll try collecting one of every component, else I’ll go insane.  Doubly so as I’ve not yet worked out how many ways there are of assembling the plastic G4 Pink Horrors.

Wailer, Pink Horror of Tzeentch – Project Change XXVI

This is Wailer – Pink Horror of Tzeentch. Another of the first generation of orkoid Pink Horrors by the talented Kev Adams. He’s unusual that he’s got a very sullen face more befitting a Blue Horror.

Wailer - Pink Horror of Tzeentch

His arms are awfully gnarly and have lots of texture I can only describe as ‘unintentionally crumbly’. It’s odd, as the main body is nice and crisp and a joy to paint. Meh.

He’s accompanied by a second of my iridescent Harpies, which aren’t really Tzeenthcian so don’t really count towards Project Change.

My collection of Tzeentchian artefacts is growing like some sort obscene shrine, and now it’s even jumped media. Here’s a piece Tony Ackland artwork I bought.

Tony Ackland Lord of Change

This is the Lord of Change that appeared in Realm of Chaos: the Lost and the Damned. Yep, it’s the original (not a print or reproduction), as you can see the pencils where Mr. Ackland changed the pose.

Tony Ackland Lord of Change

My friends have recently started referring to my pad as the Didsbury Warhammer Museum because I take such fetishistic pleasure in collecting and displaying all this stuff.

Balamir de Storchion, Sorcerer of Tzeentch – Project Change XXV

Three arms. Bird head. One armoured foot. Magic rings. It must be some classic Chaos goodness, today in the shape of Balamir de Storchion, Sorcerer of Tzeentch.

Balamir de Storchion, Sorcerer of Tzeentch

Again, this is a casting that’s visibly aged. The scroll is quite pudgy with rounded corners – the original clean crisp lines having been eroded by years of man-handling, stripping and casual abuse. I suppose old plastics keep their shape much better than classic lead.

In the Dark Tongue, you would write his name out as…

Balamir de Storchion in Chais Runes

The last three runes representing (left to right) Tzeentch’s Gift of Magic and the Chaos attributes Beaked, Multiple Arms and Feathered Hide. I toyed with the idea that instead of Beaked it would be the Tzeentch Gift Face of a Lord of Change, but figured his head wasn’t quite that impressive.

Here’s the chap with the most recent additions to Project Change, neither of which I felt photographed well originally.

Some Sorcerers of Tzeentch

When I get nine of the Fantasy Sorcerers painted, I want to field them a squad of Thrall Sorcerers for a power-armoured Sorcerer. Soon…

First Thousand Son – Project Change XXII

I’m continuing my focus on the Thousand Sons with the classic 1990 Jes Goodwin Thousand Son.

Jes Goodwin's first Thousand Son

I’ve got ten of them! It’s taken months and months of trawling through eBay, buying one here and one there and now I finally got enough for a complete squad without paying more than a couple of quid each. They’ve stripped back beautifully too. In fact, I have one too many (the last auction I won was for a group of four) so I can test a second scheme out before deciding how the squad’ll be done.

As I’ve just started reading A Thousand Sons, I thought I’d try implementing the colour scheme on the excellent Neil Roberts cover artwork.

A Thousand Sons

As you can see, Neil’s interpretation of the Heresy-era Thousand Sons features quite understated headpieces, leaving plenty of scope for them to get corrupted by the time the Battle of Terra comes.

This is an awesome model. The early 1980s Chaos Renegades were sculpted by the Michael and Alan Perry and Kev Adams. This was at a time when Chaos had a yet undeveloped visual identity, and so most models were unique mindfracks with crazy bespoke armour. They involved a lot of cross-over from the design of the 1980s Chaos Warrior, with elements or H. R. Giger thrown in. Though the sculpting quality was a tad primitive, they were full of a vibrant creativity. Here are two. (Hell, I’ve been whining about doing red without it looking Khornate too long now so I just went and painted a World Eater.)

Retro Renegades

Then, in 1990 a young Jes Goodwin came along and produced a renegade model for each major Chaos God. At about the same time Jes was working on the then-new mk7 Space Marine armour (which endures through to this day), and he took a lot of the design elements through into these Renegades. So much so they’d not look out of place in modern 40K armies, despite being 20 years old.

Jes Goodwin's cult marines

Interestingly, this is the first type the Egyptian motif appears for Tzeentch. Prior to this, Thousand Sons were just gribbly fungus bird marines.

And finally, I’m not sure if I’m cheating the terms of Project Change here (i.e. no conversions), but rather than model the first of the Marines with the Chaos Renegade backpack, I chose the mk7 Imperial backpack. Neil Robert’s illustration doesn’t feature the debased stabilser jets of Chaos backpacks (which I’ve written about at length here). Ah well, I’ve got another nine to paint with the correct backpacks.